CHARTS & PLATES

Crossing Restrictions

Awhile back we got a note from a reader based at Denver Centennial. He was concerned about a speed restriction on their ILS Runway 35R. We did a little digging and found that the FAA had already concluded this wasnt such a good idea and removed the restriction. However, this still makes good fodder for these pages, so lets take a closer look.

High-Latitude Approach

You asked for an iPad 4 last month, but the guy in the red suit brought you a mini. You want to visit him to discuss his error, so you plan a trip to the airport closest to the north (magnetic) pole: Resolute Bay. But, when you open the approach plates, youre confused.

Lead Radial tip-offs

Despite the quips about aviator egos barely fitting inside the cockpits that carry them, pilots have a high tolerance for following directions.

Mag Course mismatches

I looked at the arrivals into Chicago OHare and noticed something peculiar. Both the BENKY ONE and BRADFORD FIVE arrivals have a transition route from Kirksville VOR (IRK) to LOAMY intersection. But the BENKY arrival shows a course of 068 degrees while the BRADFORD arrival shows 059. I put IRK direct to LOAMY in my GPS ... and got a third course of 064.

No-arrival sectors

What is it with arbitrary rules and aviation? Like how some security Ph.D. determined that a quart bag of three-ounce containers dont constitute a security threat but a single quart of Pepsi does. Maybe they think terrorists arent smart enough to pool their resources. Or maybe the TSA brass just has something against soft drinks.

No Two-for-one here

Fly IFR enough and reading an approach plate becomes something akin to ordering at your favorite diner. You know everything on the menu. When Lorna the waitress tells you theyre fresh out of the sweet potato fries that let you pretend youre getting a vegetable with your triple-bypass cheeseburger, you call for the onion rings instead without asking for your options. Hey, onions are vegetables too, right?

Direct to a fix with /U

Flying the system without an IFR GPS these days can be a frustrating experience. Youre plodding along the airways while you listen to more-equipped birds getting time-saving directs off-route.

Varied TRSA Depictions

In-betweens are always tough, and have the potential for trouble. Flying some IFR practice in VFR conditions is a perfect example. Youre emulating one set of rules (IFR) but youre actually bound by another set (VFR). There are all sorts of potential traps here: maintaining cloud clearances, conflicting with traffic youd normally be separated from, and blundering into airspace without the required communication or permission.

On Your Own in Class G

According to 14 CFR 91.173, an IFR flight plan and clearance are only required for flight in controlled airspace, yet most of us have to at least occasionally depart airports within Class G airspace, essentially the only uncontrolled airspace we use. Class G usually ends at 700 or 1200 feet AGL, though there are remote places where its all the way up to 14,500 feet. Other than this, there is little guidance in the regulations…

Voil Volpe

If there was ever a high-performance document, the instrument approach procedure chart (plate) is it. Flying an approach asks a lot of us. Information needed for an IAP, SID or STAR must be retrievable quickly and correctly off the chart while minimizing head-down time away from the instruments.Until the mid-1990s, approach charts evolved without scientific study, driven instead by user feedback and flight safety. Liability proved a mixed blessing. Litigation motivates accuracy, but also makes…

Missing the Point

Few situations require quick judgment like deciding to go missed with weather at minimums. Arriving at missed approach point or decision altitude, the pilot must determine if the runway environment is in sight and the required flight visibility is evident. If these conditions are met, is the aircraft in a position to land and is the runway condition suitable? All of this must be accomplished while flying through a sea of obstructions at about 150…

Is Expired Data Usable?

There is no question that pilots planning to fly IFR should always keep a current database in their approved GPS. Its not difficult and it demonstrates a professional attitude toward instrument flight and aircraft maintenance. In the perfect black and white world of flight schools and checkrides, this would be standard. However, in the real world of dumb luck and Murphys Law, this topic gets a little murky. …