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Weekly tips, technique and training from IFR.

September 2017

Full Issue (PDF)

Download The Full September 2017 Issue PDFSubscribers Only

Assuming you own an airplane or fly the same one all the time, consider joining the type club supporting that aircraft. Okay, that’s your takeaway. Let me explain why I recommend that. I’ve owned three airplanes. My first was a mighty Cessna 150 and I was too young and too ignorant for aircraft ownership, so that one doesn’t count. Next was a Mooney, a 1968 M20F Executive. Older and wiser then, I had previously joined the Mooney Aircraft Pilots’ Association (MAPA).

Briefing

Briefing: September 2017

Icon started to deliver airplanes to customers in June, and let them “take them home and fly them wherever they want,” the company said in its annual newsletter. The first deliveries went to owners in Seattle, Montana and California. To support these A5s, Icon said it trained authorized maintainers at their home airports. “We are continuing to grow the third-party partner network to service upcoming deliveries that aren’t near factory service centers, currently in Vacaville and Tampa,” Icon said. The company also said it has trained more than 125 pilots at its two Icon Flight Centers, and added that it hopes to deliver 15 more aircraft by the end of this year and ramp up to 200 deliveries in 2018.

Features

Painting the WeatherSubscribers Only

The end of summer is near, which means a gradual decrease in thunderstorm activity in the northern hemisphere. But with the return of autumn, we will regularly see the jet stream over the United States. This means more opportunities for precipitation to organize into severe storms. It’s a good time to get up close with radar again and pick up on some things you might have missed in previous training.

It Looks Like It’ll WorkSubscribers Only

My guardian angel has a perverse sense of humor. I can’t count the number of times I’ve done the wrong thing for the right reasons and had it turn out better than if I had seen it clearly from the start.

Why We Make MistakesSubscribers Only

Our coverage of the FAA’s Compliance Philosophy (April 2016 and April 2017 and in this issue) begs the question of how generally well-intentioned and experienced pilots fall out of compliance in the first place. A little research shows that falling onto the dark side can be slow and insidious with undesired side effects, eventually capable of triggering an incident or accident. …

Compliance Legalities

In the April issue of IFR, Fred Simonds wrote an article that did an excellent job of explaining how the FAA’s “Compliance Philosophy” program, started in 2015, seeks to encourage pilot compliance with the regulations through guidance rather than punishment. He also provided data that strongly indicated it has had the effect of reducing the number of pilot deviation events (potential violations) that turned into violation actions seeking punishment of pilots to nearly zero. But, you’ll still want to be careful.

Approach Clearance

There’s little that’s more essential to an instrument pilot than the approach clearance. We controllers issue them all day long. I fully expect much of my frequency time to be spent issuing approach clearances for either training flights or weather-related needs.

A Bit Over Ninety

It started with a reader question about the RNAV (GPS) Y Rwy 28L at Monterey, CA (KMRY). The question seems simple on the surface: “There is a feeder from the SNS VOR to HIXAR on a heading of 146 degrees. The inbound course is 235, meaning an 89-degree turn is required. Are you required to fly the HILPT? AIM 5-4-9 (5) and (6) seem to say yes, but 5-4-5 (8) seems to say a turn from the feeder of less than 90 degrees is implicitly NoPT.”

On the Air

On The Air: September 2017

A few years after the big red “Do Not Enter” circle was drawn over Washington, DC, I needed to attend a meeting in Silver Spring, Maryland. In spite of advice against it, I decided to fly my 182 into College Park Airport (KCGS), which would, of course, take me directly into the forbidden zones around DC (ADIZ and Flight Restricted Zone). A couple days before departing my southern Illinois home I called ATC and got the detailed entry instructions.

Readback

Readback: September 2017

I submitted a PIREP yesterday that didn’t get disseminated properly. Not only did it not show up during the 1.7 hours left in the flight, it wasn’t listed when I checked after landing on the aviationweather.gov/adds web site for PIREPs in the previous eight hours. However, after submitting an inquiry about this to Lockheed Martin, it showed up the next morning (about 20 hours after the flight).

Remarks

Type Clubs are Good

Assuming you own an airplane or fly the same one all the time, consider joining the type club supporting that aircraft. Okay, that’s your takeaway. Let me explain why I recommend that. I’ve owned three airplanes. My first was a mighty Cessna 150 and I was too young and too ignorant for aircraft ownership, so that one doesn’t count. Next was a Mooney, a 1968 M20F Executive. Older and wiser then, I had previously joined the…