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Wake Turbulence

Wake Turbulence

We take you into a thorough discussion of how to recognize, avoid and, if necessary, survive a wake event so your loved ones dont have to attend one.

Let me say at the outset that general aviation pilots do not have to worry about wake turbulence because wake turbulence will only be dangerous on takeoff, departure, climb-out, enroute, descent, approach and landing. See, no problem. Oh, uh…wait—that pretty much covers the entire flight, doesn’t it? Maybe we should worry about wake turbulence.

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How Far Can You See?

How Far Can You See?

The regulations require the requisite flight visibility in order to land, and that might be better than reported visibility. The first step is knowing how to determine your flight visibility.

Three simple conditions must be met to land from an instrument approach: being in a position to land, having the runway environment in sight, and possessing the required flight visibility. The first requirement is straight-forward and the second is thoroughly articulated in the regs. The third requirement, though, is a little thorny.

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Fibbing on Frequency

Fibbing on Frequency

When pilots arent completely honest, it doubles the ATC workload. Not only must controllers separate airplanes, but they must also separate fact from fiction.

Like flying itself, air traffic control is complex at first glance, but below the surface it’s driven by basic principles. One ATC cornerstone is the need for timely, accurate information. As an air traffic controller, when I ask a question or issue an instruction to a pilot, the ol’ “trust but verify” adage kicks in—but only to a point.

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Who Draws the Lines?

Who Draws the Lines?

Have you ever wondered about the origin of instrument approach procedures? Who creates those procedures and what rules do they follow?

Somebody, somewhere, has to come up with the procedures in which we entrust our lives and that of our passengers when we’re penetrating the muck, following some ethereal radio signal hoping there’s sufficient clearance from the myriad obstacles that can exist. An awesome responsibility, that. Who does it?

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Hi-Tec Routing

Hi-Tec Routing

Youve heard about TEC routes and thought youd give one a try. Now, you cant find one to use. We struggled, too, but once found theyre usefulonly in SoCal and the Northeast.

Around 1980, the FAA tried using adjacent approach control facilities to manage traffic through or within major metropolitan areas. The practice was dubbed tower enroute control (TEC), also called Tower to Tower. But these names are misleading because pilots on TEC routes never talk to tower controllers while enroute.

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Wake Turbulence

Wake Turbulence

We take you into a thorough discussion of how to recognize, avoid and, if necessary, survive a wake event so your loved ones dont have to attend one.

Let me say at the outset that general aviation pilots do not have to worry about wake turbulence because wake turbulence will only be dangerous on takeoff, departure, climb-out, enroute, descent, approach and landing.

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Southeast Summer

Southeast Summer

Weather across the United States is at its best in the summer, but isnt without hazards. Planning a trip to Disney World? Heres what the southeastern states might have in store.

If you think summer weather in the southeastern states means sunshine and VFR, you probably haven’t experienced one of the numerous warm-season ground stops on traffic going to Atlanta. Granted this part of the country gets plenty of blue sky, but it’s also when the region gets the bulk of its precipitation.

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